White House Goes Quiet on the Comey Situation

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The White House has been rather quiet, ever since news surfaced that FBI Director James Comey has a paper trail of his conversations with President Trump. The President has also limited his activity on Twitter and went a full day without using his Twitter account to comment on any of the news memos that accuse him to trying to put an end to Comey’s investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Sean Spicer has reported to the media that President Trump is very eager to “get to the bottom” of the controversy surrounding his communications with Comey which has taken a toll on everyone present in the White House. “The president is confident in the events he’s maintained and that he wants the truth and these investigations to get to the bottom of this situation,” Spicer told.

Although, President Trump has not directly commented on his talks with Comey, “Look at the way I’ve been treated lately, especially by the media,” he said during a commencement address at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. “No politician in history — and I say this with great surety — has been treated worse or more unfairly.”

During a brief seven-minute session with the media, Spicer was dodging questions and refusing to answer any direct questions about whether the president wishes to see Comey testify before the Congress, or whether he intends upon waiving the executive privilege to allow both men to freely narrate their version of the events.

A comparison was made to the Watergate scandal that took down President Richard Nixon. However, he continued to refrain from making any comments.

One former campaign manager commented on the White House’s efforts to give the media some breathing space instead of giving them something that could later result in legal trouble. “You don’t want to put someone out there if there is a risk they’ll extend the news cycle,” the source said. “You expose yourself to a lot of unknowns and give the media more to cover when, in the end, they’re going to knife you anyway.”

The White House found themselves in a much similar situation after Trump’s surprising firing of Comey last week and then reports surfacing that Trump had leaked highly classified information in his meeting with Russian diplomats.

Each time the White House carefully crafts its explanations, Trump does more damage to them hours later in either television interviews or his posts on Twitter.

“Clearly they feel besieged and they have a right to, the enemy is in the building,” said Barry Bennett, a former transition adviser.