New Info Raises More Questions About Vegas Shooting Timeline

Security Sweep
What did he see?

Almost a month after the Las Vegas shooting – the largest mass shooting in American history – more questions are being raised about what a Mandalay Bay security guard really saw that night.

Jesus Campos was a security guard with the hotel and casino where Stephen Paddock stayed before committing a massacre that killed nearly 60, and wounded almost 500 more. During the mad chase to stop Paddock’s massacre, Campos was shot in the leg, and has since been hailed as a hero that helped save many.

In the days immediately after the shooting, Campos left the United States for Mexico, returning just days later to the US, using a rental car. His lawyers contend that it was a trip that was scheduled far ahead of the events of the October 1st shooting – and it has been noted that he made a similar trip this past January.

Strangely, after numerous bizarre and puzzling cancelations of planned interviews, Campos was eventually interviewed by Ellen DeGeneres. Media outlets also learned that Campos had not, in fact, been licensed by Nevada’s Private Investigator’s Licensing Board. Fox News inquired with the Nevada Sheriff as to the requirements for working security at Mandalay Bay and if such a license would have been required – but no answer was forthcoming.  The police department responded, “Jesus Campos is a victim and we don’t speak about victims.”

This new piece of information begs the question of why were the law enforcement agencies would allow Campos — a figure who heavily enmeshed in the Las Vegas shooting timeline — to leave the country during an active investigation of such a critical nature.

The new information also begs the question of how could Campos have comfortably traveled from the U.S. to Mexico after reportedly being shot in the leg by Paddock. More to note, Campos’ appearance on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” was also assisted by a cane. The trip from Las Vegas to San Ysidro alone is a trip of over five hours drive in travel time. Carlson also never specified whether Campos was driving, or whether he was a passenger, or even if he was traveling alone.