Delta Loses Massive Tax Break After Cutting Off The NRA

Airline Pilots
"We have now reached our cruising altitude - at which the 2nd Amendment no longer matters"

Delta Air Lines took a strong stand against the NRA—but now, that decision could wind up costing them $50 million in tax breaks.

The Georgia Senate has promised to block a massive tax break that would benefit the Atlanta-based airline—unless the company reversed its position and reinstated its discount program for NRA members.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle (R) took to Twitter to slam the airline, tweeting: “I will kill any tax legislation that benefits Delta unless the company changes its position and fully reinstates its relationship with NRA. Corporations cannot attack conservatives and expect us not to fight back.”

In question is about restoring a fuel tax break, worth about $50 million, which expired several years ago. Delta had been trying to convince the state to reinstate it, at taxpayer expense.

The tax break has already passed the Georgia House of Representatives, and now Republicans in the Georgia Senate are scrambling to remove the language from the Senate bill.

The backlash against the NRA comes in the aftermath of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on February 14. Since then, many voices on the left—and some in the Republican Party as well—have called for more gun control.

Despite having no ties to the alleged shooter, the NRA has emerged as a top boogeyman for anti-gun activists. As a result, a number of major corporations have severed ties with the NRA—including car rental companies National, Enterprise, Hertz, and Alama, and airlines like United and Delta. Only one major company, FedEx, has refused to cave to pressure and is still offering discounts to members of the NRA Business Alliance.

If Georgia’s strong stance against Delta is any indication, these companies could regret taking such a strong stance against the NRA.